Skip to main navigation Skip to main content Skip to footer

547 – 13th Street
(Lots 14/17, Block 30, Plan 16)
Brandon, Manitoba
Designation Date: October 6, 2003
Designation Authority: The City of Brandon

This 1¾ storey house is believed to have been built in 1881 during the city’s first decade of settlement and was the homestead residence of one the first settlers of the area, James Arthur Johnston. This yellow brick structure reflects a variety of architectural styles, but the tall narrow paired windows at the front of the building and the brick string course suggest that the predominant architectural style is Italianate Revival. The rear of the structure is of brick construction, while the front is a wood frame with a brick veneer. The foundation is a combination of various sized stones and gravel (rubble) with a mortar of lime and sand.

The home has had several owners who were significant to the economic and political development of Brandon. James Johnston was a farmer, cattle dealer, land broker and proprietor of Johnston Estates. He owned some 1,500 lots in the city which he sold as business and residential sites. Johnston was also an alderman on Brandon City Council from 1883 to 1885. The property was then owned from 1902 until 1922 by Archibald Charles Douglas, the County Court Bailiff, and later sold to Marion Doig in 1941. It remained in the Doig Family until 1993. The Doigs have been local proprietors in the City of Brandon since 1906.

This house is one of the oldest single family residences still occupied in Brandon and represents an important feature in the historic development of Brandon and its people.

Download this information as a PDF

1605 Victoria Avenue
(Lots 1/2, Block 16, Plan 2)
Brandon, Manitoba
Designation Date: March 23rd, 1992
Designation Authority: The City of Brandon

Casa Maley was designed and built in 1912 by architect W.H. Shillinglaw. Built at a cost of $12,500, the home originally belonged to Henry Fitzgibbon Maley, founder and president of the Brandon Brewing and Bottling Company. Maley lost the house four years after it was built when prohibition spelled the end of the brewing business. Dr. Henry MacDiarmid purchased the property at that time and it remained in the MacDiarmid family for two generations.

Erected towards the end of Brandon’s great economic boom, the house is representative of the stately homes that grace the central area of the city. The three-storey home’s unique appearance can be attributed to the combination of European, Tudor, and Gingerbread styles. The Tudor styling, expressed in half timbers and dramatic play of dark and light patterns, was a popular architectural expression of the era. The spacious interior includes an ornate staircase constructed in quarter cut oak. Wood detailing of exquisite craftsmanship can also be found throughout the house.

In recent years, the home has served as a bed and breakfast establishment and as a care facility.

Download this information as a PDF

924 Rosser Avenue
(Lots 21/22, Block 60, Plan 2)
Brandon, Manitoba
Designation Date: July 24, 1995
Designation Authority: The City of Brandon

The Laplont Block was built in 1892 for Brandon’s first barber, Jack Laplont. Laplont operated a barbershop and cigar store here for several years; however, the block’s high cost of construction and upkeep ruined Laplont financially. In 1900 the building was sold to the Confederation Life Association which occupied it until 1902. Mutter and Lynch Grocers rented the building for their retail business, then subsequently purchased the block in 1905. In 1907 the store was renamed Mutter Brothers Grocery Store and was operated by the Mutter family until the business closed in 1976. Many of the store’s original furnishings and fixtures are on display in Brandon’s Daly House Museum.

The two-storey block was designed in the Romanesque Revival style by local contractor F.J. Chubb. The block’s brick facade is highlighted with heavy stone arches on the second floor. Small, semi-circular stained glass panels are inset across the top of the second-storey arched windows. Decorative end pieces highlight the cornice above the first floor and the roof line.

The LaPlont block is the only building on the block whose entire original facade remains intact.

Download this information as a PDF

1133-1137 Lorne Avenue
(Lots 37/40, Block 45, Plan 2)
Brandon, Manitoba
Designation Date: July 10, 2000
Designation Authority: The City of Brandon

This 2½ storey brick building was built in 1892 by Bell Brothers Construction Company. Originally a four-unit terrace home, the building boarded many of the Bell Brothers Construction workers at that time. It is the largest and one of the oldest multiple family dwellings in the neighbourhood. In 1918, it was converted into an eight-suite apartment block and later, in 1979, it was converted into a fourteen-suite unit. The Bell Brothers were the most prominent building contractors in early Brandon and were noted for their use of high quality materials and fine workmanship. The company constructed both private and public buildings and at one time employed over forty workers. This Italianate style structure was built with bricks from the first kiln in Brandon at McVicar’s Brickyard and features such decorative elements as a raised band of brick encircling and forming arches above the windows. The peak of each gable is highlighted with elaborately patterned brickwork including an infilled arch known as a blind arch.

Download this information as a PDF

McGill Field
(S ½ 19-11-12)
Brandon, Manitoba
Designation Date: August 28, 2000
Designation Authority: The City of Brandon

Construction of the airplane hangar began in November of 1940 and was completed and opened for service on May 10th, 1941. The building was one of over six hundred hangars erected by the federal government between 1940 and 1943 and is one of only a few surviving in Canada. The hangar was built by Bird Construction of Winnipeg.

The building is associated with the training of military personnel during World War II under the Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Aircrew personnel from Australia, New Zealand, England and Canada were all trained under the Plan. Canada was chosen as the training country because of its preferable climate and because of the fact that it was far from the dangers of enemy activity. The Plan was referred to by Winston Churchill as Canada’s greatest contribution to the Allied victory.

The hangar now houses the Commonwealth Air Training Plan Museum. It is the only hangar known to be committed to housing artifacts of the Plan.

Download this information as a PDF

Do you have any stories or comments to share about a heritage property in the City of Brandon? Contact us online.